promoting tedx video

Getting and delivering a TEDx Talk (or any type of fantastic video content) is only the beginning of the journey for that video. What comes next is how you get more people to watch the incredible thing you’ve created.

Other content creators will often ask what I did to get my TEDx talk on the skill of humor to over 5 million views. I wish I could tell you that I had a specific process with exacting results, but the truth is I tried a bunch of things and also just got lucky. I delivered a talk I was proud of that seems to resonate with people and has steadily grown in popularity over time.

With that said, I think there are some strategies you can use to get the video in front of more people.

Ideas for Promoting Your TEDx Video

  1. Watch the talk! Yes, you should watch your own talk so you remind yourself of how you did AND how the video came across (plus every view helps, especially early on). While watching, be on the lookout for short snippets you can use for promotional posts (see #3).
  2. Share the video with your friends, family, and fans. Think of your dearest fans and share it with them. They’ll be excited to see you in action and won’t care if your talk only has a few hundred or thousand views. Encourage them to like and comment on the video so that the video shows engagement early on.
  3. Share the video on social media (Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, and LinkedIn). Your first couple of posts can be, “Check out my talk!” Pin one of those posts so that it’s the top social media post on each profile. Then schedule out a series of posts that include snippets of your content (see #1). This could be in the form of a picture quote, a short clip from the talk, or positive/funny comments on the video. I also included a picture from my TEDx talk on my online dating profiles at the time and know it led to at least a couple of additional views because of it.
  4. Publish a post or a newsletter about your video. Share the release of the talk with your followers. However, instead of just saying “here it is,” add some value. Either include the story about the experience, give the transcript, or share key takeaways from the talk.
  5. Suggest the video to sites that align with your talk. Submit it to the appropriate subreddit (such as the one for TED Talks), email it to editors of sites like Upworthy, and share it with bloggers who write on the topic you speak about.
  6. Add the link to your email signature. After your name and whatever other signature details you want to include, add a link along the lines of “Check out my TEDx talk on TOPIC.”
  7. Post the video to your website. If it makes sense, add the video as the first thing people see when they visit your site. Don’t make the video autoplay because nobody likes that, but create a compelling image / call-to-action so that people want to click play to hear the talk. Note: One exception to autoplay is if you use the video (muted) as the background on one of those fancy parallax sites, then definitely have it autoplay.
  8. Send the video to previous clients. If you run a business (such as speaking or coaching) related to your talk, reach out to former clients to let them know you’ve given a TEDx talk on the topic. Mention that you wanted to share the talk as it could serve as a refresher for their attendees (and may be a good reminder for that client to book you again).
  9. Send the video to potential clients. When you start interacting with potential clients, send them your video so that they can “see you in action.” This works for incoming inquiries or people you’ve met at a networking event (assuming they express interest in learning more about what you do).
  10. Post about the “aftermath” of the video coming out. Share with people what’s happened since the talk. It could be an analysis of the impact the talk has had or you reacting to the comments on the video. You can also post when the video hits certain milestones. This will remind people that they can check it out and starts to give social proof that other people like the video. Milestones to consider: 1,000 views, 10,000 views, 100,000 views, 250,000 views, 500,000 views, and/or 1,000,000+ views. No, a single new view or comment is not a milestone.

You’ve done the hard work of creating a compelling piece of content, don’t let it go to waste by not doing the hard work of sharing it with more people. Have your own idea of how to promote your video? Share it in the comments!

 

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